Ridgeview Elementary School

OTHER INFORMATION

Click on your child's grade level for information about supplies and curriculum.

PEAK PARENTS

PARENTING GIFTED KIDS

WHAT IS GRIT?

Grit is the perseverance and passion for long term goals.  It means:

  • Working strenuously toward challenges.
  • Maintaining effort and interest over years
  • Overcome failure, adversity, and plateaus in progress

DEVELOPING GRIT

Understand that grit exists
Understand that the ability to learn can improve with effort

Pursue your passion
Build in practice time.
Keep going!
Learn from examples of people who overcame failure
Focus on the process instead of just the end product
Visualize goal and obstacles that might pop up along the way
Have a plan for dealing with obstacles
Periodically review progress and make adjustments

 

Click here for Angela Duckworth's TED talk on grit.

FOR PARENTS TO THINK ABOUT

GRIT TIP #1:  Put a challenge in front of your child.

Many gifted children have difficulty with risk taking.  Encourage your child to try something new that is difficult for him/her.  Remember, if your child never has a chance to deal with something difficult, he/she will never develop the confidence to overcome challenges.

Grit Tip #2 Promote perseverance.

Make sure your child understands that even naturally gifted people have to work hard to hone their ability with hours of practice.  Follow the rule, “Don’t Quit on a Bad Day”.  Giving up as soon as things get frustrating may mean you could miss out on that “break-through” moment!   Try to follow through on activities at least until the end of the season or session.

Grit Tip #3:  Promote a growth mindset.

Remind your child that there is always something new to learn and improve upon.  Success will depend on sustained effort.

EMOTIONAL VOCABULARY

Many gifted students have "emotional intensities".  They may react very strongly, especially when frustrated.  Following you will find some of the emotional vocabulary we use in class that may be helpful for you at home as well.

FIFTH GRADE:

WHEN THINGS ARE HARD

  • Mistakes and frustration and a part of life (from 10 Things Every Scientist and Mathematician Should Know)
  • Your brain isn't growing new connections when things are easy
  • Self-efficacy: the belief that you can conquer challenges through hard work and your strategies
  • Metacognition: thinking about what you are doing. What strategies are you using? Are these strategies working for you? What could you try instead?

SELF-REGULATING BEHAVIOR

  • Control resources of time, study environment, and using peers/adults to help you
  • Increase self-efficacy and deal with stress/emotions that interfere with learning

HANDLING OVERWHELMING FEELINGS

  • When your amygdala takes over, how can you get your frontal lobe back in charge?

FOURTH GRADE:

POSITIVE HABITS OF MIND:

  • Metacognition-thinking about what you are doing. What strategies are you using? Are these strategies working for you? What could you try instead?
  • Engage intensely especially when answers are not immediately apparent.
  • Make and carry out a plan using necessary resources.

 

 

PARENT RESOURCES